Failover: A Key Part Of Business Continuity

Imagine the relief of knowing that no matter how bad the attack, disaster or data breach, new requests or queries can be redirected to an unaffected system or database.

  • May 26, 2021 | Author: Todd Hyten
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It just doesn’t seem fair.

The organization that targeted Colonial Pipeline’s ransomware attack, Darkside, operates as a ransomware-as-a-service (RaaS). That means they operate similar to any software-as-a-service, allowing paid users to access special software designed by the “hosting” organization. 
 
Even relatively unsophisticated hackers can download any ransomware or exploit and reap the ill-gotten “rewards” (which they, of course, share with the RaaS host). They even have discussion boards for support and tips. 
 
In a world where RaaS is a thing, it makes sense for an enterprise of any size to consider disaster recovery-as-a-service (DRaaS). DRaaS allows businesses to even the playing field with RaaS—and offer protection against a wide variety of disasters (natural or man-made). 
 
Understanding how DRaaS does this is key to getting a potential client onboard, so here’s a quick description of one of the key features of DRaaS.
 
Failover is the ability to quickly switch over to standby network, database or server. Think of it as an insurance policy against failure due to man-made or natural disaster. The failover version can be physical or cloud based.
 
In many enterprises, a ransomware attack may necessitate a shutdown of servers and databases to quarantine and backtrack affected data. This could mean unaffected data or servers are no longer accessible—and the enterprise gets frozen in time. Nothing can get done because office suite data or CRM data is locked down. 
 
Imagine the relief of knowing that no matter how bad the attack, disaster or data breach, new requests or queries can be redirected to an unaffected system or database. That means near-seamless business continuity—allowing for business to go on as usual during a crisis.
 
With some DRaaS versions, a client can set up failover for components of a system, such as storage devices or even cell phone processors. The last thing your client may want is to have their C-level employees shut out of their phones during a crisis. 
 
The choice of failover to a physical or cloud environment offers a lot of flexibility to clients, no matter their size. Of course, a cloud-based option may be more robust, especially in the event of natural-disasters.
 
Ultimately, business continuity is about not just overcoming a crisis, but being able to be resilient enough to keep the doors open during a crisis. Failover is the key part of DRaaS that makes that happen.  

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